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Archive for the ‘Exploits’ Category

Decrypt Full Disk Encryption products for $299 – Well, it got cheaper at least

December 21, 2012 Leave a comment

Many people have contacted my team and I over the last few days about the recent announcement by ElcomSoft, that they offer a tool to decrypt Bitlocker, PGP and Truecrypt volumes.

This $299 tool is advertised as getting you access to this encrypted data quickly and easily…

Now, this may sound exciting, but as they say, there’s always a catch – you need a memory dump from the machine from when it was authenticated to use this tool – yes, no recovery if you find a cold machine. You have to get access to it while it’s on and the user has logged in, then, after they switch it off, you can recover the data..

Sounds familiar? Well it should, it’s exactly the same idea Passware.com released to the world back in 2010 – I even blogged about it then… Read more…

Piggybacking WiFi at 60mph

September 7, 2011 Leave a comment

I was in Madrid speaking at a conference a couple of months ago, and arriving after one of my favorite trans-Atlantic flights (you know the ones, where the ratio of screaming children to adults is not conducive to rest or even playing Angry Birds) I was excited to take one of the citi-cabs which have free wifi onboard to my hotel, a 45 minute journey away.

It was an interesting experience to say the least – though getting completely car-sick in the process, I managed to clear my inbox, answer a dozen questions on Community.mcafee.com, and also catch up with the news care of Google and the BBC. All in all, it was a most productive journey. Read more…

Categories: Exploits, Mobile

Two charged with data theft from June ’10s AT&T hack…

January 19, 2011 2 comments

Reported today by infosecurity-us and others, the two men (Andrew Auernheimer, 25, of Fayetteville, Ark., and Daniel Spitler, 26, of San Francisco, California) who had fleeting fame after publishing insecurities in the AT&T iPad website in June 2010 have been arrested and charged with one count of conspiracy to access a computer without authorization, and one count of fraud in connection with personal information.  Each count carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a fine of $250,000.

You can find the formal press release on the Justice.gov site.

The original hack involved farming the subscriber details off AT&Ts site by presenting it with random ID codes. Unfortunately, while demonstrating a weakness in a site is often not prosecuted, the pair went on to retrieve 120,000 subscriber details and then passed them on Gawker, who published a redacted list amongst much fanfare. This distribution of personal data will probably get them into a lot of hot water.  Read more…

Passware release Bitlocker/Truecrypt Decryption Tool

April 5, 2010 Leave a comment

Following on from my post “10 Things You Don’t Want To Know About Bitlocker”, “TPM Undressed” and “Firewire Attacks Revisited” it recently came to my attention that Passware, Inc. A feisty California company has released a version of their forensic software which will decrypt Bitlocker and TrueCrypt protected hard disks via the classic Firewire vulnerabilities.

A full write-up can be found on the Passware site, but simply, given a machine that’s running, but has encrypted drives (for example one using Bitlocker in TPM-only mode, or a machine which is suspended, not hibernated). As to how to do it, well they have implemented the exploit in a very neat and usable way:

Read more…

TPM “Undressed..”

February 16, 2010 7 comments

Recently it was announced with much fanfare that the now-ubiquitous “TPM” chip found in most modern computers had been hacked. This obviously unnerved a lot of people, especially those hanging the safety of their secrets on free solutions like Microsoft Bitlocker which use the TPM to provide convenience to their users.

The attack, invented about 60 years ago, but elegantly implemented by Christopher Tarnovsky of Flylogic involved attacking the hardware of the chip itself by uncasing it and probing its signal pathways – something that seems difficult until you read their blog and realize they do it every day.

Chris used a combination of off-the-shelf acids and rust-remover solutions to dissolve first the outer casing of the chip, then the wire grid tamper-proofing shields inside.

Once “undressed” he was able to probe and monitor what was going on inside anonymously. Read more…

“Cheap” Secure USB Sticks, you get what you pay for?

January 6, 2010 5 comments

Recently a whole slew of news sites announced a newly discovered vulnerability (care of the German Security firm SySS) on a range of “supposedly” secure consumer USB sticks.

These models from SanDisk, Kingston and Verbatim were apparently easy to defeat and retrieve the data from without knowing the users password or having any prior knowledge or touch on the stick.

The exploit was simple – it seems the software tool shipped with the sticks validates the password, not the stick itself, and the sticks use a fixed authentication key. Yes, ALL sticks use the same auth key. By simply sending this known ack key to the stick, you can unlock it, or any other stick.

Interestingly, some of these insecure devices had been through FIPS 140-2 Level 2 security certification, so should really have been immune to this kind of attack.

Read more…

Evil Maid, another nefarious trojan attack..

November 17, 2009 2 comments

Last month Joanna Rutkowska posted a very interesting article showing a practical “Evil Maid” attack against the open-source TrueCrypt FDE product.  The attack is reasonably simple, subvert the pre-boot authentication engine of the full-disk encryption product in question to add a password-sniffing routine, then wait for the unsuspecting user to authenticate to their machine and then retrieve the credentials at a later stage.

Evil Maid is simply hooking the pre-boot code of TrueCrypt and adding a routine to store the users password. Because the TrueCrypt code is quite simple, it’s a relatively easy thing to do, but the attack is theoretically valid regardless of this fact, just the effort to make the hook code increases with the sophistication of the pre-boot environment. Read more…

Cold Boot Attacks Revisited (again).

September 16, 2009 2 comments

Following my recent post on FireWire Attacks, I thought I’d follow up on that other classic Full Disk Encryption exploit, The “Cold Boot Attack”.

Back in February 2008 a group of clever Princeton students published their infamous paper “Lest We Remember: Cold Boot Attacks on Encryption Keys“. Though the retention of data in RAM chips has been known since their invention, and certainly since at least 1978, The “Princeton Paper” reminded us that when you turn a computer off, it does not mean all the data from memory is instantly gone, and of course, if something important remained, like an encryption key, then your computer security might be vulnerable. Read more…

Firewire Attacks Revisited

September 14, 2009 4 comments

For those who follow these kinds of things, you’ll remember that back in 2004 an enterprising group of people (Maximilian DornseifMichael Becher, and Christian Klein) gave a series of talks on how to bypass many kinds of computer security using the FireWire ports. This attack, though obvious from reading the specification of the Firewire / i.LINK / IEEE 1394 bus, simply used a computer acting as a “rogue” device to read and modify any memory location on a target PC.

Yes, ANY memory location, and that’s quite supported, even required by the FireWire/iLink specification, which needs direct-memory-access for some devices (like iPODs) to function.

Enterprising people have written attacks that use this “exploit” to get around encryption products, and locked workstations on Mac, Linux and PC.

Read more…

Is Encryption enough? Why just encrypting data doesn’t solve today’s information security concerns.

September 3, 2009 4 comments

“But if it’s encrypted, why do I need to login?” the customer across the desk asks me with incredulity.

I realise that I’m about to get into a discussion which boarders on theological and raises passion in both security and business leaders alike. A discussion that I’ve had many times over the last two years, and will have many more times in the near future.

“Because, without authentication, there’s no point to encryption”. I reply, knowing full well that this isn’t an answer that’s wanted, or understood.

With a stifled sigh I start to explain.. Read more…

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